The IT Certification Resource Center

Featured Deal

Get CompTIA, Cisco, and Microsoft training courses free for a week.
Learn More ❯

Are Your IT Skills Hot or Not? (And Does It Matter?)

In the perpetually list- and ranking-driven IT employment realm, there's a continual reshuffling and resetting of which skills and certifications are in demand, and which aren't. Should you pay attention?

Hot or Not multitaskerIt is sensible for IT professionals to follow which tech skills are in high demand in today's job market. Armed with such knowledge, IT pros can make better decisions when it comes to choosing additional training, or allowing their increasingly less relevant skills to fade over time.

 

This evaluation of IT skill supply-and-demand is the motivation behind Dice.com's intriguing Examining the Hottest (and Coldest) Tech Skills webpage. You can read a little bit more about it here.

 

Dice.com is a job search site that has catered to information technology and engineering workers since the early 1990s. The hot-and-cold tech skills webpage features an interactive graph that displays the relationship between the number of job seekers who list a particular IT skill in their Dice.com profiles, and the number of job postings on the Dice.com site that inquire about that same skill.

 

The result is a multi-plotted cloud shape that shows the supply-and-demand relationship for an impressive 1,400 different tech skills.

 

Well, tech-ish skills. The methodology Dice.com is using to populate the graph creates some peculiarities. Some of the “tech skills” we discovered in the graph included the following:

 

● Leadership
● Project Management
● Cashier
● Bookkeeping
● Russian
● Talent Management

 

So, some of the skills listed on the graph are only tangentially related to the IT industry, or have been included out of context. Still, it is interesting to spend some time with the interactive graph and discover where certain skills fall in Dice.com's supply-and-demand formula.

 

There is a risk, however, in taking such data at face value, especially if you’re thinking of using it to choose what category of IT training you should take next. Here are some mitigating factors that IT pros should consider before using the Dice.com online tool and other such reference guides to make training choices, or decide what their worth is in the current job market.

 

We’ll discuss the vagaries of the Dice.com tool in particular, but these are good rules of thumb to consider when evaluating similar recommendations from any source.

 

It's Not Just What You Know — It's Where You Know It

 

The Dice.com information doesn't offer any breakdown by geographical area. Every tech skill's supply and demand rating is nationwide only.

 

This doesn't take any regional differences into account. It doesn't give you the most relevant information for your city, or let you know where your particular skill set is in the greatest demand (or in the lowest supply).